Press Releases

Press Release – FAA TO ENFORCE NEW RULE ON TARMAC DELAYS

Fictional Press Release developed by Claudia Teixeira under the direction of Professor Mike Long for the Masters in Public Relations / Corporate Communications program at Georgetown University.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                Contact: Claudia Teixeira

September, 22 2009                                                                             Phone: 240-888-0452

                                                                                      

 FAA TO ENFORCE NEW RULE ON TARMAC DELAYS

Airlines will have to limit tarmac delays to a maximum of three hours

and provide food and water for passengers kept waiting for longer than two hours

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will enforce a new rule to limit tarmac delays that was recently approved by the government and proceeds to be signed into law.

According to the new rule, airlines would have to limit tarmac delays to a maximum of three hours. Additionally, airlines would have to provide food and water and clean bathrooms for passengers that are kept waiting inside an airplane for longer than two hours. Fines for violations can amount to $27,500 per passenger.

“FAA will enforce this law that is about ensuring passenger’s health and safety,” said J. David Grizzle, FAA’s Chief Counsel. “We are committed to protecting consumers, and we will work to ensure that airlines and airport personnel comply with the new regulation.”

Airlines will have to coordinate with airport operators to develop a contingency plan for lengthy delays. FAA will issue directives for air traffic personnel pertaining to tarmac delays requests. The best situation would be to never hold an aircraft with boarded passengers on the ground for more than three hours. However, for emergency situations, the pilot-in-command will notify the local air traffic control and measures will be taken for passengers to return to the terminal.

The rule to avoid lengthy tarmac delays should be signed into law until the end of this year.

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